March 2022

City directories: Just boring phone phonebooks?

Genealogists know that city directories are not simply phone books, rather that these resources were created for businesses to get access to customers and vice versa.  They are genealogy gold ready to be mined!  Ralph L. Polk, the most widely known publisher, began his business with 1872 Evansville, IN directory, listing the names and addresses of all residents of the town.  Early Polk directories included a variety of information useful to genealogists including county courts, stage lines, steamboat companies, count residents on rural routes, and other detailed information on the locality.

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Santa Fe Hospital (Part 4)

The Santa Fe Hospital in Topeka, Kansas was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2016 recognizing the building’s significant role in healthcare for the State of Kansas and specifically, Santa Fe railroad employees.[1]  Located near downtown Topeka when it was constructed, the hospital was an integral piece of Topeka’s history.  This final article of the four-part series examines the evolution of the cutting-edge medical facility for ATSF employees tried to adjust to a modernizing world.

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Santa Fe Hospital (Part 3)

The Santa Fe Hospital in Topeka, Kansas was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2016 recognizing the building’s significant role in healthcare for the State of Kansas and specifically, Santa Fe railroad employees.[1]  Located near downtown Topeka when it was constructed, the hospital was an integral piece of Topeka’s history.  This article, the third in a four-part series, will focus on the architecture of a modern hospital and its evolution to senior living.

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The Avalon: Finding the Story that Lies Beneath the Surface

One of the reasons I like genealogy is I really enjoy delving into someone’s records to determine just what story lies beneath.  This was certainly true when I was researching a small apartment house called The Avalon in Manhattan, Kansas, to help determine its eligibility for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. What intrigued me most was the name of the man who transformed the single-family home into apartments: Landrine Cisero Sheriff. Here is his story.

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